By Jean-Jacques Slotine - Applied Nonlinear Control: 1st (first) Edition

Nonlinear Systems Paperback – Unabridged, 2014

Using the FreeRTOS Real Time Kernel - Standard Edition

Electrical Power Systems Quality, Third Edition 3rd Edition

Electric Power Distribution Engineering, Third Edition 3rd Edition

Smart Grid: Fundamentals of Design and Analysis

Power Line Communications: Principles, Standards and Applications from Multimedia to Smart Grid 

VSC Transmission Operating Under Unbalanced AC Conditions—Analysis and Control Design

Abstract—This paper presents an analysis and a new control

design of a voltage-source converter (VSC) transmission system

operating under unbalanced network conditions. The system

is analyzed in the positive and negative synchronous reference

frames. The proposed control strategy contains a main controller

and an auxiliary controller. The main controller is implemented in

the positive d–q frame using decoupling control without involving

positive/negative-sequence decomposition. The auxiliary controller

is implemented in the negative-sequence d–q frame using

cross-coupling control of negative-sequence current. Simulation

results using the SIMULINK power system blockset show good

performance of the proposed control strategy for a 300-MW

300-kV dc VSC transmission system during both balanced conditions

and unbalanced conditions as may be caused by a solid

single-phase-to-ground fault.

 

 Reference:

1.0 IEEE Transaction Paper - Weblink

Power Quality

Power Quality

Blackouts Illuminate India’s Power Problems

For two consecutive days in July, India experienced blackouts that took down large portions of the country’s power grid. The second outage was the largest in history, leaving more than 600 million people, nearly a tenth of the world’s population, without electricity. The blackouts brought renewed attention to the country’s power sector, which is struggling to supply India’s growing demand. They exposed weak links in the transmission system, inadequate fail-safe systems for preventing cascading failures, and a lack of proper outage planning.


The 30 and 31 July failures may have affected more people than any blackout ever, but it’s tough to argue that they were the most disruptive. “I did not even know that there was some problem in the grid, because I was working from home, and in this building we have 100 percent backup,” says Sivakumaran Govindarajan, a member of the India Smart Grid Forum, who lives just outside Delhi, the largest city affected by both blackouts. 


 

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